Cooking

How to Cook with Pickle Juice

7 recipes that use everyone's favorite brine
Pickle Recipes
Photo: Tasting Table

You should know by now not to throw away pickle juice. Sure, you could take a shot of it (with or without whiskey), but since it’s basically pickle-flavored vinegar, you could just as easily cook with it. Here are seven ways to use pickle juice in your favorite everyday recipes.

Coleslaw
The key to a solid coleslaw lies in mastering the combination of vegetables, salt, dressing and add-ins. Sub pickle juice for vinegar in dressing any of our coleslaw recipes, like this classic dry mustard- and celery seed-spiced version.

Dipping Sauce
All you need are four staple pantry ingredients to make a thousand island-like condiment. Vehicle of choice is up to you, though chicken tenders and french fries are clear front-runners in our minds. Or pair it with fried pickles in an act of nose-to-tail pickle jar cooking.

Pasta Salad
This is comfort food at its finest, thanks to the addition of both pickle juice and crunchy sliced baby dills. The key here is tossing the just-boiled water with half a cup of pickle juice to briefly marinate.


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Carla Hall’s Hot Chicken
Brine is just a fancy way of saying “pickle juice,” so you can also use it to marinade grilled chicken or a roast bird. A Ziploc bag will be your friend here, as all you have to do is place the pickle juice brine and the chicken inside and let them get acquainted for a few hours.

Macaroni and Cheese
In the same vein as pasta salad, pickle juice helps take something good and make it excellent. If a pickle juice-tinted cheesy béchamel sauce isn’t enough for you, this recipe also calls for potato chips, Sriracha and strips of bacon.

Deviled Eggs
They may look the same as your everyday deviled egg, but dill pulls a hat trick in pickle, juice and herb form here.

Mashed Potatoes
Think salt-and-vinegar chips but in a silky, spoonable iteration. And since the pickle juice gives this popular side so much flavor already, there’s no need to add butter—unless you want to, that is.

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