Dining

Seeds You Can Eat

Unusual seeds you didn't know you could eat
Photo: Tasting Table

There’s a new healthy snack on the rise, and chances are you’re throwing it away. We’ve known for years that nuts are a great source of nutrition including heart-healthy fats, protein, vitamins and minerals, but no one has really talked about seeds. -Until now.

It’s hard to resist the call of L.A.: constant sun, more avocados than you can juggle and 365 days of dining outside. But this is the age of online shopping, meaning you’re just a few clicks away from having California’s best-selling jam at your doorstep in mere days. Spare the plane ticket and spend your money on these 10 essential L.A. products instead.

① Watermelon seeds
The next time you are about to crack open a watermelon, don’t discard the seeds. According to the National Institutes of Health, the seeds are rich in vitamin B and are a great source of magnesium, which helps regulate blood pressure and aids metabolism. LIVESTRONG reports that watermelon seeds are high in protein, with “1 cup of dried seeds containing 30.6g, which is 61 percent of the daily recommended value.” Enjoy them dried and roasted.

 

② Papaya seeds
While papaya may not be the typical fruit to purchase for that fruit salad, you might change your mind knowing that you can eat the seeds, too. It has been reported that these seeds are good for your digestive health with high levels of digestive enzymes and antibacterial properties. Eat by themselves or toss over a salad.   

 

③ Apple core and seeds
Who knew that when they say, ”An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” means the whole apple? Apparently, we’ve been eating apples the wrong way for years, because you can consume the fruit entirely. Though there have been some studies reporting that apple seeds contain traces of cyanide, most people say you’d have to eat an excess amount. Next time you decide to have an apple for a snack, don’t be afraid to enjoy the entire thing!

Butternut squash seeds
Everyone knows about roasting their pumpkin seeds, but what about those from butternut squash? These seeds offer many nutritional benefits including doses of vitamins A and C, and are high in fiber. Roast them in the oven with a little olive oil and sprinkle with a pinch of salt.

 

Roasted cumin & chili butternut squash seeds �

A photo posted by Melissa Sabra (@melissasabra) on

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