Dining

Links We Love

Our favorite food stories from the week
Photo: Katie Foster/Tasting Table
Tandoori Chicken

This week, we peeked inside a wide range of kitchens, from Eric Ripert's Le Bernardin to the home kitchen of two journalists living in a studio apartment in Mumbai, India. Travel envy hit reading about a chef's tour of San Sebastian and a food writer's pizza crawl in Rome.

As great food writing does, our favorite reads this week made us hungry and have inspired us to spend some time cooking this weekend. We hope they do the same for you.

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The Guardian enlightens us on Eric Ripert's "compassionate approach to business," and Thrillist lets us in on the "secrets only restaurant servers know." Both articles will surprise you.

From Saveur, we learn the integral value of the pressure cooker to Indian cooking with a beautiful look at a cuisine we don't often get.

Elsewhere across the globe, a lucky writer follows Grant Achatz on an epic research trip around San Sebastian, in which food hangovers are cured by tapas crawls. The journey will leave you hungry and ready to book your next vacation.

Katie Parla's pizza crawl of Rome, featured in Lucky Peach, may inspire you to tack on an extra leg to that vacation.

Closer to home, however, the New York Times reminds us of the glories of modern Italian dining right here in the U.S. when it takes a deep look at Mezzaluna, a "little restaurant that started a revolution."

And speaking of classics, Modern Farmer details the chefs rediscovering schmaltz, a welcome example that "what's old is new again."

Finally, on a more serious note, Eater pleads for an end to "racist restaurant reviews" in an important response to insensitive comments. It's brave and honest and worth your time, just as much as this longer read from the food website: "How Gullah Cuisine Has Transformed Charleston Dining."

Find Le Bernardin here, or in our DINE app.

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