20 Lindt Lindor Truffles, Ranked Worst To Best

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Lindt Lindor truffles aren't just a modern treat — Lindt has roots dating back to 1845 when the Sprüngli family created the first solid chocolate bar in a small Swiss candy shop (via Lindt & Sprüengli). In 1879, chocolatier Rodolphe Lindt accidentally conched chocolate longer than usual — an entire weekend longer. Conching is a process that improves chocolate's flavor and texture, per the Encyclopedia of Food Safety. In 1899 Lindt joined forces with Johann Rudolf Sprüngli, and 40 years later, in 1949, Lindt perfected its silky-smooth recipe. Fusing the French word for gold ("or") with Lindt, the semi-eponymous name Lindor was created. Wrapped Lindt Lindor truffles were first sold as a seasonal holiday item back in 1967, per Lindt.

We are already big fans of Lindt's creamy, delicate chocolate; it won first place in our rankings of the best chocolate brands. Whether you pop them in your mouth whole, bite them in half, or use them as proto-hot cocoa bombs, Lindt Lindor truffles are a beloved treat all year and a popular gift at the holidays. We sliced each truffle in half to check the fill level and explore the truffle's interior. Then, we ranked them from worst to best based on taste and texture. Maybe you'll even find your next new favorite truffle to try.

20. Dulce de Leche

We had high hopes for the Dulce De Leche milk chocolate truffle, but it ended up being the worst one we tasted. The milk chocolate shell is filled with a dulce de leche-styled center that tastes nice at first with an adequate caramel flavor. After the initial hit of caramel, the taste takes a turn into an overpowering artificial taste that becomes cheap and poorly done. 

The aftertaste is weirdly chemically and off-putting, and no one in our tasting panel finished this truffle. The filling was a little thicker than most of the other varieties we tasted as well, but it still melts smoothly on your tongue. 

19. Snickerdoodle

The dark red-brown wrapped seasonal Snickerdoodle truffles have a pretty speckled white chocolate shell with crunchy brown nubs we assume were supposed to taste like snickerdoodle cookies. The interior is Lindt's traditional creamy white chocolate. These truffles didn't taste like snickerdoodles to us — the balance of the spices seemed off and way too strong.

After looking at the ingredients, we suspect allspice is the culprit here. There are barely any notes of cinnamon, and the overall spice level completely overshadows any of the dairy or white chocolate flavors. Unfortunately, "These taste like the holidays gone wrong," according to one of our tasters.

18. Double Chocolate

We assumed the only thing better than a chocolate Lindt truffle would be a Double Chocolate Lindt truffle. Yet, we were wrong. This treat comes wrapped in burgundy foil, and it has a milk chocolate exterior that cracks to reveal a darker chocolate filling.

Our tasters were stumped, searching for the words to describe what we found to be an unpleasant, "kind of funky" off-note. There was also a thread of bitterness in this one. Rather than being enjoyable, like a smooth and balanced high-end dark chocolate, that bitterness, combined with the weird aftertaste, adds up to what a few tasters simply called "yuck."

17. Milk and White Snowman

This chocolate is labeled as Snowman truffles at the holidays, but ours came inexplicably wrapped in black Halloween foil. They have a milk chocolate shell and a creamy white chocolate filling. This wasn't a bad truffle, but it wasn't great. Tasters thought it was bland and boring.

The white filling was the least flavorful of all of Lindt's fills, and the milk chocolate shell wasn't thick enough to add much flavor — combined, it equals a truffle that's not worth the calories or money. While this had the characteristic Lindt creaminess, it's not worth buying when the brand makes much better and more interesting styles.

16. White Chocolate

Coming in a brassy gold wrapper, the White Chocolate truffles have a white chocolate shell and a matching creamy white chocolate center. This is one of the only truffles we pegged as being a little too sweet, maybe because it didn't have much going on flavor-wise. The white chocolate is delicate and tasty, but it is on the subtler side. In an all-white chocolate truffle, we found ourselves wishing it had a little more oomph. 

Overall, we found this to be one of the most humdrum truffles we had tasted. If you enjoy white chocolate, look for one of Lindt's truffles that contrast the velvety flavor against other tastes that make it pop.

15. Stracciatella

Even our tasters who don't love white chocolate were excited to try the pale blue-wrapped Stracciatella white chocolate truffles, which we assumed would taste like stracciatella ice cream. These have a white chocolate shell studded with chocolate cookie pieces and a creamy white chocolate filling. However, this was another one that tasted too sweet to us.

The cookies-and-cream vibes of this truffle weren't bad, but the spare amount of cookie pieces didn't stand up to the amount of creamy filling, leaving the texture and taste off-balance. "It's not bad ... it's just not good," said our more diplomatic taster. Others politely tossed the remainder of their truffles without finishing them.

14. Matcha

As huge fans of green tea ice cream, we thought the Matcha White Chocolate was an interesting truffle to try, and we were intrigued to see how the tastes translated. The truffles come in pea-green wrappers and have a white chocolate shell with striking green centers. This one was a bummer. The matcha notes are way too subtle and were overwhelmed by the stronger white chocolate flavor.

A little touch of bitterness and ramping up the matcha notes would have made this one a home run. This wasn't an unpleasant bite, it was creamy, and the hint of green tea was nice, but matcha is a finicky flavor, and we felt it could have been done bolder and better.

13. White Peppermint

The seasonal White Peppermint has a pretty white chocolate shell speckled with red candy-cane-like pieces and a smooth white chocolate interior. The candy cane nibs add an interesting crunch to the mouthfeel, and unlike many white chocolate and peppermint candies sold around the holidays, it wasn't overwhelmingly sweet.

The peppermint notes seemed to fade a little faster than the mint in the other mint variety we tried (like the Mint Milk), but the level of the mentholic was nicely done. White chocolate fans will enjoy this minty truffle, but the other tasters in our panel didn't enjoy this one, saying frankly that it was "kind of bland."

12. Almond Butter

The Almond Butter Truffle has an almond butter-flavored filling slightly thicker than any of the other truffles we tasted — it's not quite as melt-in-your-mouth as Lindt's other offerings, and we missed that characteristic creaminess. It tastes more like a candy than a true truffle. There was a hint of salt in the almond butter filling that worked well against the sweet chocolate and nuttiness of the almonds.

The almond itself was adequate, but we thought it overpowered the delicate milk chocolate of the shell. Perhaps this filling would have worked better with a darker chocolate exterior. It's not a bad combination, but the less melty, creamy center ruined what was otherwise a decent flavor profile.

11. Caramel

Our caramel-obsessed taster assumed the Caramel Milk Chocolate Truffle would be their top pick. The taste of caramel was still a little cheap and fake, tasting like the Dulce De Leche truffle, but not as strongly so. The caramel paired well with the milk chocolate flavor, and there was no strange aftertaste like in the Dulce De Leche. 

This isn't a bad truffle, but the caramel notes aren't strong enough, and we thought this was kind of a dud. A stronger, slightly bitter caramel would have had more of an impact. We weren't sure anyone would be able to pick this out as a caramel-esque filling without knowing what it was before taking a bite.

10. Extra Dark (60%)

We were excited to try the 60% Extra Dark chocolate truffles, and though peaking in the top ten, this one let us down a tad. All of our tasters agreed this tasted flat, like it was missing something — depth, or the roundness of flavor we expect in dark chocolate, for example. The level of sweetness was subdued (like all Lindt truffles), but so was the bitterness in the dark chocolate, leaving us with a weirdly diluted and mild-tasting "extra dark" chocolate. 

For some, the higher cacao level created some drying on the palate, which seemed odd without the expected accompanying earthiness. We tasted the shell and filling separately, and the filling seems to be to blame; it had a serious lack of taste for dark chocolate. This truffle needs to either be sweeter or more bitter — or both — to rank higher.

9. Strawberries & Cream

The Strawberries & Cream truffle had our testers divided. The strawberry tasted "a little like pink Starburst" to some, and others thought it tasted like "pretty fresh" strawberries. There was an overwhelming floral smell and tasting note that made us think of rose petals instead of strawberries.

The slight crunchiness of this truffle also reminded us of strawberry seeds, which was interesting but not necessarily desirable. The strawberry notes paired well with the creamy white chocolate notes, but overall we felt that this one tasted too perfumey to be ranked any higher. Without the distracting floral note, this would have done even better.

8. Peppermint Cookie

The Peppermint Cookie milk chocolate truffle is a seasonal option that we will admit to having stashed at the back of our pantry to make it last longer in the dark days of January. The outer shell is milk chocolate with small chocolate cookie bits, and the interior is creamy peppermint milk chocolate. 

Overall, the taste of this truffle is balanced, and the mint level is just right — if a touch too low for our liking. The crunchy chocolate pieces make this treat a little more interesting than Lindt's completely smooth varieties, but we wished there were a few more of them because they were a fun addition — maybe in more of a Ferrero Rocher style.

7. Milk Chocolate

The Lindt Lindor Milk Chocolate is the original flavor, launched way back in 1967. We thought it might be a little underwhelming (is that sacrilege?), but there's a reason this was such a hit back in the sixties. We can imagine shoppers lamenting when it left stores at the end of the holiday season.

The truffle makes the most of the matching nature of the milky chocolate shell and silken earthy interior. It's balanced, it's basic, but it's also very well done — it's a classic example of a milk chocolate truffle. This would be a great go-to flavor if you were giving this as a gift to someone whose preferences you don't know.

6. 70% Extra Dark

After not loving the 60% cacao truffle, we didn't have high hopes for an even darker truffle. Surprisingly, this delightful snack was significantly better. While it did lean more bitter than the 60% — which we expected — it created more of a contrast between the darker filling and lighter outer shell. That, in turn, created a more interesting combination and also balanced the overall flavor of this truffle.

We tried the filling and shell separately compared to the 60%, and this truffle was better tasting on both counts. It did have a slight powderiness on the finish. Dark chocolate lovers will enjoy this truffle, but anyone who isn't a fan of higher cacao in their chocolate will want to steer clear.

5. Sea Salt

We were a little worried the sea salt would be too strong in this truffle or that it might have crunchy specks that were too heavy-handed. We were pleasantly surprised to find this chocolatey truffle was silky smooth with a perfect salt level that balances the subtle sweetness of its milk chocolate shell and filling.

The salt brings out some of the milky dairy notes that aren't as accented in other truffle styles. The salt made this more interesting than some of Lindt's simpler flavors. Anyone who enjoys salted chocolates will love this classic contrast.

4. Hazelnut

The Hazelnut milk chocolate wrapper was almost indistinguishable from the Almond Butter truffle, but there were big differences within. Lindt's Hazelnut truffle has a nut-studded milk chocolate shell and a creamy milk chocolate center. The hazelnut infusion was not overpowering and well paired with the milk chocolate. The center of this truffle wasn't overly thick like the Almond Butter flavor. It didn't remind us of Nutella, which we expected, because it was more milk chocolate-forward. 

The crunchy hazelnut bits on the outside were enjoyable, contrasted with the creamy center. Many types of truffles on this list had a contrast of flavors or texture between the shell and interior, but this one had a strong and pleasant distinction in both.

3. Mint Milk

The Mint Milk Chocolate flavor comes wrapped in an appropriately green wrapper. The level of mint in this creamy truffle was just right, and the cooling sensation created by the mint as the chocolate melted on our tongues was perfection.

While it's not labeled peppermint like the holiday offerings, it does contain peppermint oil. It wasn't too sweet or too menthol-like — our tasters thought it reminded them of a fancier version of Andes candies. This had the overall balance the minty holiday truffles were missing, which is just as well, given that this one is available all year long.

2. Dark Chocolate

While Lindt's other dark chocolate-focused truffles had a powdery or dry aftertaste and an unbalanced flavor, we were pleased with its plain Dark Chocolate variety. Coming in a dark blue wrapper, this truffle had a solid depth and all of the trademark creaminess you expect from Lindt's fillings. This isn't ultra-dark chocolate — we think it could even convert those who prefer milk chocolate. 

While it doesn't contain any crackly niblets for textural purposes like many of the other truffle types we enjoyed, this is the quintessential creamy Lindt truffle and a great style for dark chocolate and milk chocolate lovers alike.

1. Fudge Swirl

The gold-wrapped Fudge Swirl truffle was the most interesting-looking treat. A nice bullseye pattern of milk and white chocolate emerged when we cut into it. We expected more of a dark fudgy hit, but this was lighter in flavor than anticipated — and more interesting. The sweetness is just right, and it had an almost marshmallowy aspect reminiscent of s'mores in the aftertaste.

Lindt says this is a blend of its white and dark chocolate fillings with a milk chocolate shell. Combining the best of all three flavors makes for a truffle supreme in mouthfeel, taste, and aesthetic. It's worthy of the gold wrapping it comes in.