Recipes

Homemade Beer Bread Recipe

Pour out a cold one for this simple, no-rise-required loaf
6 Ratings
100% would make again
Beer Bread
Photo: Meghan Uno/Tasting Table

Beer and bread have similar creation stories: Yeast meets sugar; sugar becomes carbon dioxide and alcohol; tasty carbohydrate is made.

So it's only natural that sooner or later, the two would get hopped up on each other, which is exactly what happens in this simple no-rise loaf. The carbonation in the beer, plus a hefty amount of baking powder, lifts the dough for a quick bread that tastes fermented, thanks to dormant yeast in the bottle. And aside from the speedy start-to-finish time (let's face it, waiting just sucks sometimes), the beer gives your final result a uniquely hopped flavor.

The beauty of this recipe is that similar to beer made with food, each loaf tastes different depending on your brew of choice. We went with a classic Stella lager for our standard version, but it's a good way to use any leftover pumpkin brews during autumn or fruitier ones in the spring. Experiment with ingredient swaps to complement your beer—say, a cup of oat flour to match an oatmeal stout—or adding cinnamon to a pumpkin-ale-based loaf.

Note: I've made this many times with PBR, and no one was any the wiser.

Beer Bread

Recipe from the Tasting Table Test Kitchen

Yield: 1 loaf

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour and 5 minutes, plus cooling time

Ingredients

3 cups all-purpose flour

1½ tablespoons baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

¼ cup light brown sugar

12 ounces lager (or beer of your choice)

2 tablespoons butter, melted and slightly cooled

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 375°. Grease an 8½-by-4½ loaf pan and set aside.

2. In a large bowl, whisk the flour, baking powder, salt and brown sugar to combine.

3. Pour in the beer and stir with a wooden spoon until just combined. Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan and top with the butter.

4. Bake the bread until golden brown and firm, about 1 hour. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then allow it to cool on a wire rack before slicing and serving.

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