The Zesty Condiment We Seriously Wish Trader Joe's Would Bring Back

In 2017, fans of Trader Joe's wasabi mayonnaise were devastated when their beloved condiment was discontinued. This was an all-around mayo that was excellent for spreading on bread, crackers, lettuce — anything you can slather a zesty sauce on. Upon termination, a sudden outcry rang from fans, which promptly saw the product return to Trader Joe's grocery shelves. But this victory was short-lived, as the national chain later dealt customers a second blow by discontinuing it in 2019. This time, indefinitely.

Trader Joe's wasabi mayo was a condiment in a league of its own. It was a spruce-up of regular mayonnaise with a bit of kick from the spicy wasabi, so that meant it was just as rich, with every dollop serving an extra punch than regular mayo. That said, its versatility is what made Trader Joe's condiment stand out. You could put this stuff on almost anything. Whether slathered between a sandwich, mixed into a coleslaw, or added to your ranch salad, it was the jar to grab for an instant flavor upgrade. Another lovable feature of Trader Joe's wasabi mayo was its durability. That, and its dreamy texture. Some fans described its luscious feel that was thick, creamy, and smooth, so you could add the spread to an otherwise dry and boring dish if you dared to end up with something more appealing.

A little wasabi brought big flavors to Trader Joe's mayo

What was most fascinating about Trader Joe's wasabi mayo is that wasabi was the last item on its ingredients list. We know the last ingredient in the product constitutes the least amount by weight, so we wouldn't think wasabi had any business being in the product's name at all. But if you know about wasabi, you won't be too surprised. Whether you use it as one of your dipping sauces for sushi or mix it with mayo like Trader Joe's condiment, a little wasabi truly goes a long way. Upon eating it, most will probably remember this Japanese horseradish for its nose-burning sensation more than anything else. So you never want to overdo it, and Trader Joe's must've considered this when whipping its condiment together.

If you also consider that the real wasabi can cost more than $300 per kilo, it can explain why most sushi restaurants settle for the fake stuff. We'd like to hope that Trader Joe's did an outstanding thing and used real wasabi in its condiment, but the truth is that most wasabi eaten in the U.S. is the imitation version, so there are very few chances that the former is the case. What we can commend Trader Joe's for, however, is how it managed to pull off authentic wasabi flavors that make the mayo zesty without scorching your sinuses, real wasabi or not.