Hawaiian-Inspired Pineapple Stuffing Recipe

The average person probably doesn't eat stuffing on days that aren't Thanksgiving (or perhaps Christmas, for some). However, there's nothing about the dish that prevents you from enjoying it on an average night. There's bread, meat, herbs — a little something for everyone, so it can make for a great side for all sorts of meals. Plus, if you're not in the mood for the classic variety featuring sage and sausage, there are plenty of ways to shake your stuffing up. One unique, simple riff is this Hawaiian-inspired pineapple stuffing, which combines the tropical fruit with Spam, shredded coconut, and Hawaiian sweet rolls.

"I think the inclusion of Spam is a little different. It brought this nice, salty component to balance the pineapple," recipe developer Kara Barrett says. "I haven't had Spam in a while. I know it's gotten trendier, but I was surprised how much I enjoyed it in this dish." She also offers this tip for your journey: "Cooking time and texture will vary based on pan size. Choose a smaller pan for a deeper-style stuffing and a larger pan for a more crumbly style." Let's get cooking!

Gather your ingredients for Hawaiian-inspired pineapple stuffing

This recipe calls for pineapple chunks, and you can use either fresh or canned pineapple. If you opt for the latter, Barrett recommends straining out the liquid in the can. You'll also need a pack of Hawaiian sweet rolls, a can of Spam, one egg, an onion, a stick of unsalted butter, salt, chicken stock, and unsweetened coconut flakes, plus chili sate paste if you want an extra kick. If you don't have sate paste, Barrett says, "You can add a touch of spice with some chile flakes." She also adds, I'd recommend homemade stock if it's handy. Store-bought will do in a pinch, though."

Step 1: Prep oven

Preheat oven to 350 F.

Step 2: Prep bread rolls

Tear rolls into small, 1-inch pieces.

Step 3: Add to pan

Spread evenly on a parchment-covered sheet pan.

Step 4: Toast your stuffing bread

Toast in the oven for 10 minutes.

Step 5: Slice up Spam

While bread is toasting, cut Spam into small, bite-sized pieces. Set aside.

Step 6: Cut onion

Roughly chop your onion.

Step 7: Melt butter

In a skillet, melt 6 tablespoons of the butter.

Step 8: Cook onions

On medium heat, saute the onions until soft and fragrant. Add a few pinches of salt to season, then set aside.

Step 9: Brown the Spam

On medium-high heat in the same skillet, fry Spam until it browns.

Step 10: Combine the Hawaiian stuffing components

In a mixing bowl, combine Spam with pineapple, onions, 1 ¼ stock, and chile sate paste, if using. Taste and add salt, if needed.

Step 11: Begin assembling the stuffing

Add bread to a buttered casserole dish.

Step 12: Add the meat and fruit

Cover with the Spam mixture and combine well with a wooden spoon.

Step 13: Add some stock

Add reserved stock, or more as needed. The bread should be saturated but not falling apart.

Step 14: Bring in the butter and coconut

Add the remaining butter in pea-sized pieces on top of the stuffing and sprinkle with coconut.

Step 15: Put the stuffing in the oven

Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes.

Step 16: Continue baking

Uncover and bake for an additional 20 minutes, or until the top is golden brown.

Step 17: Garnish and serve your Hawaiian-inspired stuffing

Serve warm. Garnish with more coconut and chile sate paste, as desired.

Can you prep any part of this Hawaiian-inspired pineapple stuffing recipe in advance?

Though this isn't a particularly complex recipe, you may still want to split up the steps if you're pressed for time. Fortunately, this recipe has plenty of opportunities for advance planning. "You can toast the bread, prepare your spam, and mix your wet ingredients, sans the eggs. I'd add those last. Or, prep the whole dish and keep [it] in the fridge overnight," Barrett says. This should come in handy if you're having a busy week or if you're serving this dish to guests and don't want to be occupied in the kitchen the whole time. Since many of the ingredients come in a can or are shelf-stable, you can shop for this recipe in advance, as well.

As for leftovers, that part is fairly straightforward. "Treat it like normal stuffing," Barrett says. "Wrap well, refrigerate, and reheat in the oven. I'd only keep it a few days; it's going to be best fresh."

What should you serve with this Hawaiian-inspired pineapple stuffing?

People don't usually serve stuffing as a main course — even if it has pineapple in it — so you're probably wondering what other dishes you should bring to the table when you whip this up. Barrett has some suggestions: "It gave me slider vibes when I ate it," she says. "It might pair well with a Hawaiian macaroni side. Or, something green like a fresh salad." You could even get cheeky and serve it with a Hawaiian pizza (which of course, isn't actually Hawaiian but does include pineapple in a unique and savory way).

This dish doesn't have a ton in common with traditional stuffing, but if you're partial to that flavor profile, there are tweaks you can make while still staying true to the Hawaiian-inspired twists on the recipe. "You might also add an additional egg and a little sage to get a more of a Thanksgiving vibe if that's what you're going for," Barrett says.

Hawaiian-Inspired Pineapple Stuffing Recipe
5 from 21 ratings
Hawaiian-inspired pineapple stuffing resembles classic, Thanksgiving-esque stuffing only in name -- its fresh and fruity flavors are entirely its own.
Prep Time
15
minutes
Cook Time
1.17
hours
Servings
12
servings
hawaiian stuffing with chili sauce
Total time: 1 hour, 25 minutes
Ingredients
  • 1 package Hawaiian sweet rolls
  • 1 (12-ounce) can Spam
  • 6 + 2 tablespoons unsalted butter (one stick), divided
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste
  • 1 cup pineapple chunks
  • 1 ¼ + ¼ cups chicken stock, divided
  • 1 egg
  • ⅓ cup unsweetened shredded coconut
Optional Ingredients
  • 1 teaspoon chili sate paste
Directions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 F.
  2. Tear rolls into small, 1-inch pieces.
  3. Spread evenly on a parchment-covered sheet pan.
  4. Toast in the oven for 10 minutes.
  5. While bread is toasting, cut Spam into small, bite-sized pieces. Set aside.
  6. Roughly chop your onion.
  7. In a skillet, melt 6 tablespoons of the butter.
  8. On medium heat, saute the onions until soft and fragrant. Add a few pinches of salt to season, then set aside.
  9. On medium-high heat in the same skillet, fry Spam until it browns.
  10. In a mixing bowl, combine Spam with pineapple, onions, 1 ¼ cups stock, and chile sate paste, if using. Taste and add salt, if needed.
  11. Add bread to a buttered casserole dish.
  12. Cover with the Spam mixture and combine well with a wooden spoon.
  13. Add reserved stock, or more as needed. The bread should be saturated but not falling apart.
  14. Add the remaining butter in pea-sized pieces on top of the stuffing and sprinkle with coconut.
  15. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes.
  16. Uncover and bake for an additional 20 minutes, or until the top is golden brown.
  17. Serve warm. Garnish with more coconut and chile sate paste, as desired.
Nutrition
Calories per Serving 199
Total Fat 14.7 g
Saturated Fat 7.8 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 57.4 mg
Total Carbohydrates 9.1 g
Dietary Fiber 0.8 g
Total Sugars 3.7 g
Sodium 446.9 mg
Protein 7.8 g
The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.
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