Classic Mint Jelly Recipe

Mint jelly is a classic condiment for lamb, but if you've only ever had the commercially-available kind, you might not be such a fan. After all, this stuff's a bright, scary-looking green and tastes a bit like toothpaste. This homemade mint jelly, however, isn't like that at all. As recipe developer Jennine Rye tells us, "Store-bought mint jelly is nothing compared to fresh, homemade mint jelly — it's so delicious." While she acknowledges that many people may be intimidated by the idea of making their own jams and jellies, this simple recipe "is a great introduction to how fun they can be."

Since it's homemade, it doesn't last quite as long as store-bought jelly. At this point, it will need to be kept cold, but Rye says an opened jar of homemade mint jelly will only last for a few weeks in the refrigerator as opposed to 6 months for the commercially-produced kind. What you can do, however, is to store it in multiple small jars. Not only will a small jar of jelly keep for up to a year in the pantry, but as Rye says, "It makes a great homemade Easter gift."

Gather the ingredients for this mint jelly recipe

You only need 5 ingredients to make this homemade jelly, starting with fresh mint leaves. Don't toss the mint stems, though, since these can be uses in other recipes. The remaining ingredients are water, sugar, lemon juice, and liquid pectin. If you want it to have a bright green color, you can optionally add a drop or 2 of green food coloring.

Steep the mint

Chop up the mint leaves, then put them in a pot along with the water. Crank up the heat until the water is boiling, then turn off the heat. Let the mint steep in the water for 20 minutes, then strain out the leaves and discard (or compost) them.

Make the mint jelly

Measure 3 cups of mint-infused water, and pour it back into the pot. Add the lemon juice and sugar, and once again, bring the water to a boil. Once it's boiling, stir it to make sure all of the sugar dissolves, then turn off the heat. Stir in the pectin immediately, add a drop or 2 of food coloring if desired, then pour the jelly into sterilized jars.

Use the mint jelly as desired

Once you have your jelly, you'll need to decide what to do with it. While Rye notes that "Mint and lamb are a classic pairing that is hard to beat," she acknowledges that there are other ways to put this jelly to use. She suggests using it with Middle Eastern or Greek dishes, and says it would go well with eggplant or peas. It could also work as a barbecue glaze, perhaps with grilled chicken or pork chops.

Another idea is to lean into its sweet side by using it in desserts. Rye feels mint-filled thumbprint cookies might be nice, as a topping for pancakes or ice cream, or even spread between the layers of a lemon cake.

Classic Mint Jelly Recipe
5 from 51 ratings
This classic mint jelly is perfect for not only lamb dishes, but also in baked goods and topped on pancakes.
Prep Time
35
minutes
Cook Time
10
minutes
Servings
3
Cups
small jar of mint jelly
Total time: 45 minutes
Ingredients
  • 2 cups mint leaves, tightly packed
  • 3 ½ cups water
  • 3 ½ cups sugar
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 ounces pectin (liquid)
Optional Ingredients
  • green food coloring
Directions
  1. Roughly chop the mint leaves, and add them to a pot with the water.
  2. Bring the water to a boil, then turn off the heat. Let the mint steep for 20 minutes.
  3. Strain out the mint leaves, then measure out 3 cups of mint-infused water, and pour it back into the pot.
  4. Add the lemon juice and sugar to the water, and bring it to a boil.
  5. When all of the sugar has dissolved, turn off the heat and immediately stir in the pectin.
  6. Add a drop or 2 of food coloring, if desired, then pour the jelly into sterilized jars and use as desired.
Nutrition
Calories per Serving 373
Total Fat 0.2 g
Saturated Fat 0.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Total Carbohydrates 96.2 g
Dietary Fiber 2.2 g
Total Sugars 87.5 g
Sodium 26.1 mg
Protein 0.8 g
The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.
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