She Blinded Us With Science

A neuroscientist's new book lays down the laws of eating well

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With so much buzz about the diet of the moment in today's media (Paleo? Vegan Before Six? Meat After Midnight?), we're suffering from information overload.

That's why we love the new book from San Francisco-based neuroscientist Darya Pino Rose. In Foodist ($28), Rose uses actual science to explain, in layman's terms, how easy it can be to eat healthfully.

Rose eschews the all-too-common focus on deprivation. Instead, she offers solid advice on how enjoying good food can lead to better health and, yes, weight loss. In the beginning chapters, Rose breaks down popular food myths, lays out a strategy for her method of "mindful eating," offers some simple recipes, and lists 10 underrated health food (oysters and hard cheese, anyone?).

But the parts of the book we like best tackle the psychology behind taste, texture and so-called picky eating. It turns out that our brains are hardwired to decide what we like or don't like–before we've even tried it.

So now we know. And knowing is half the battle.