Big Fish

A D.C. chef is seafood's staunchest advocate

We've heard the name Barton Seaver tossed around in connection with his superlative cooking at Washington, D.C., restaurants Blue Ridge and Sonoma Restaurant & Wine Bar.

But the D.C. native has also been a longtime advocate of sustainable seafood. A believer in the powers of consumer education, Seaver recently teamed up with the Blue Ocean Institute to increase knowledge on the subject.

To start, he's sharing environmentally sound tips for seafood lovers. Here are a few of his picks for tasty alternatives to the popular (and wildly overfished) species on the market:

Oregon and Maine Pink shrimp are delicious, inexpensive and a much better option than imported shrimp–and they're available frozen year-round.

• Choose high-quality farm-raised tilapia, U.S.-farmed catfish or Pacific halibut to replace the meaty white fish orange roughy.

Striped bass's sweet flavor and thick, flaky flesh are similar to overfished grouper. Bass is great grilled or battered and fried for tacos.

Pole-caught yellowfin tuna comes very close to endangered Atlantic bluefin tuna; although bluefin's fatty richness is hard to approximate, yellowfin makes a great substitute in most dishes.