United States of Wine

These wine lists proudly fly the American flag

Step into any restaurant in Paris and chances are the wine list will be culled from a 300-mile radius–max.

But in New York, the mark of a cool wine list is how far afield it travels. Slovenia? Check. Patagonia? Natch. It takes a brave soul to go against the flow and go all-American. Here are three places that have, and to great effect.

Buttermilk Channel Doug Cromwell worked with Master Sommeliers at Blue Water Grill and Blue Fin before opening his own place in Carroll Gardens earlier this year. Because he wanted wines consonant with his Brooklyn-centric menu, he limited his list to the 50 states, with particular attention to New York. With several slate-y Finger Lakes Rieslings, a cache of Long Island Cabernet Franc, and Merlot from Red Hook's own Brooklyn Oenology ($10 a glass) in the offering, the menu tilts local in the best possible way. 524 Court St. (between Nelson and Huntington sts.), Brooklyn; 718-852-8490 or buttermilkchannelnyc.com

Henry's About three years ago, Henry Rinehart resigned his value-oriented international list in favor of an all-American one. He hasn't, however, given up his proclivity for European-styled wines, focusing mainly on lesser-known bottles from established producers. Check out Spenser-Roloson's Palaterra ($42), a lush blend of Syrah, Carignan and Valdiguié, or the cherry-rich Barboursville Barbera from Virginia ($47). 2745 Broadway (at 105th St.); 212-866-0600 or henrysnyc.com

Zoë This SoHo stalwart has been championing an all-American list since it opened in 1992. Back then, the list maxed out at 116 wines. Now wine director Stephen Loffredo has gathered more than 300 distinct bottlings, including a deep collection of older vintages and cult Cabs. Among the big names hide some great, lesser-known wines, like a Stony Hill Dry Riesling ($55). The "Zoë Picks" boxes helpfully highlight great buys at less than $40. 90 Prince St. (between Broadway and Mercer St.); 212-966-6722 or zoerestaurant.com