Food - Drink
Why You May Want To Avoid Cooking Chives
BY EMILY BOYETTE
Chives are part of the allium family, which also includes onions, shallots, garlic, leeks, and scallions. While chives offer a similar earthy, onion-y flavor compared to their relatives, they can't be prepared in the same way; in fact, cooking chives can give them an entirely different flavor, rather than a slightly more intense or deep one.
If you cook chives for too long, the heat can significantly wilt their texture and sap them of their flavor, making them useless as a garnish or flavor enhancer. Chives have delicate stems and a milder flavor than garlic or onions, making them unsuitable for high cooking temperatures; they should only be eaten raw or cooked very briefly.
Furthermore, chives don't last very long once you bring them home from the store, with a typical fridge life of one to two days, but if you store them extremely well, they may last a bit longer. EatingWell suggests wrapping your chives in a damp paper towel and storing them in an airtight container in the refrigerator.