Food - Drink
Why Do The Royals Have To Weigh Themselves Before Christmas Dinner?
By SYLVIA TOMSZAK
The holidays are synonymous with huge celebratory meals, including Christmas dinner, and the British royal family actually records proof of just how stomach-filling their holiday meals are. Royal family members weigh themselves before and after eating each of their Christmas dinners, a tradition with a surprising history.
In the Middle Ages, nobility hosted massive Christmas banquets to display their wealth, and though the Victorian era embraced a more intimate way of feasting, the focus remained on abundance. During King Edward VII's reign in the early 1900s, feast attendees began weighing themselves as a way to measure enjoyment of the meal.
It was said that if a diner gained weight (preferably about 3 pounds) after enjoying a feast, the meal was well-received and appreciated. Today, the royal family partakes in several grand feasts at their holiday home in Sandringham, and while the pre- and post-meal weigh-ins are a bit controversial, the royals remain attached to the tradition.