Food - Drink
What Makes Chicago-Style Hot Dogs Unique?
By LAUREN ROTHMAN
Sausages — also known as wieners, weenies, frankfurters, and hot dogs, in English — are a cornerstone of local cuisines around the world. Hot dogs are particularly popular in the United States, and the country boasts nearly 20 specialized regional dogs, one of the most famous being the Chicago-style hot dog.
A classic Chicago-style dog features an all-beef frank spiced with garlic, paprika, and other seasonings, nestled into a steamed poppy seed bun and topped with fresh and pickled vegetables. When ordering a Chicago dog, it's common to ask for it "dragged through the garden," or loaded up with all those tasty veggies.
The Chicago dog's origins lie with German immigrants, many of whom worked as butchers in the city and brought the Vienna-style beef sausage with them. The hot dog we know today became popular during the Depression, when a hog wiener only cost a nickel and quickly climbed up in terms of popularity.