Food - Drink
What Exactly Is Moscato Wine?
By NATASHA BAILEY
Moscato, or wine made from Muscat grapes, is made in many different styles in multiple countries, but is generally considered to be an Italian varietal. Italy produces the most Moscato in the world, and varieties can be sparkling, semi-sparkling, or still, with different flavor nuances in each bottle that are worth getting acquainted with.
Moscato does come in pink and red varieties, but the definitive Moscatos are sweet, white semi-sparkling wines like Moscato d'Asti, with fruity, floral notes, low acidity, a sweet flavor, and a lush mouthfeel. Moscato pairs well with fruit dishes and can balance out spicy or salty foods like cured meats, hard cheeses, and spicy Asian dishes.
Moscato can become semi-sweet or dry when fermented, which dissipates most of the sugar and leaves behind light, tropical, floral flavors. Like other wines, the particular region, winemaker, and grape variety affects the final bottle, though Moscato is usually made with Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains, a white small-berry grape.
Wine varieties like the aforementioned Italian Moscato d'Asti or Moscato Giallo can be found online or even at a local tasting room, depending on where you like to enjoy a drink. Some of the top Moscato varieties for purchase include Villa Alena Peach Moscato (Italy), Muscador Cepage Muscat Mousseux Rosé (France), and more.