Food - Drink
The Spanish Restaurant Where Ernest Hemingway Was A Regular
By RYAN CASHMAN
In the 1920s, literary icon Ernest Hemingway was living as a journalist in Paris, and it was during this time that he first traveled to Spain. He developed a love for the country and its culture, including one particular restaurant in Madrid that quickly became one of Hemingway’s favorites, and the place even had a nickname for him.
Staff and eaters at Restaurante Botin — perhaps the world’s oldest restaurant, founded in 1725 — called Hemingway “Don Ernesto.” The writer befriended the owner's grandfather, Emilio Gonzalez, which earned Hemingway some privileges, like making his own martinis and coming in before opening to get some writing done on the second floor.
Hemingway often dined on Botin's roast suckling pig, washing it down with several bottles of Spain's classic red wine, Rioja Alta. Restaurante Botin is very proud of its connection with the writer and displays a quote of his in the front window — though Hemingway was never allowed in the kitchen, after he botched a paella one time.