Food - Drink
The Real Reason You're Not Allowed To Bring Cheesecake On An Airplane
By LISA CURRAN MATTE
You are likely familiar with the Transportation Security Administration's Liquids Rule (aka 3-1-1 Rule) established in 2006, banning all liquids, gels, and lotions (except prescribed medicine and children's beverages) from carry-on luggage. In addition, there are food items included on the TSA's no-fly list, and one of them is cheesecake.
While cheesecake isn't explicitly named on the TSA's banned-items list, it's liquid-adjacent enough that it could be of interest to individuals with malicious intent. Other foods on the list include gravy, hummus, jams, jellies, and peanut butter.
Some argue cheesecake falls under the TSA's Rule for creamed and soft cheeses, which stipulates a carry-on allowance of 3.4 ounces. Unlike gravy or peanut butter, cheesecake is tough to measure by liquid volume, although for reference, Cool Conversions estimates one ounce of cream cheese equals approximately 1.1 U.S. fluid ounce.