Food - Drink
The Controversial History Of Oklahoma's Official State Meal
By RYAN CASHMAN
From Maine lobster and Florida’s Key Lime Pie to the Philly Cheesesteak and New Mexico’s Frito pie, some foods are strongly tied to location and regional preferences. Oklahoma took this concept one step further and legally declared its state meal in 1988 consisting of regional specialties from around the state, however, the meal has been mired in controversy.
The Oklahoma state meal consists of BBQ pork, sausage with biscuits and gravy, chicken-fried steak, fried okra, squash, black-eyed peas, grits, corn, cornbread, pecan pie, and strawberries. If you think that sounds like a lot, you’d be right, and while the “meal” was intended to be eaten throughout the day, some restaurants serve it all at once, leading to some health concerns.
When eaten in one sitting, the Oklahoma state meal has about 2,700 calories, 125 grams of fat, and 5,250 milligrams of sodium. In fact, former Oklahoma State Senator Brian Crane tried to repeal the State Meal legislation, arguing that it discouraged Oklahomans from cultivating a healthy diet, however, the proposal wasn’t passed and the Oklahoma State Meal lives on.