Food - Drink
Posset: The Old School British Dessert That Was Once Considered Medicine
By JOHN J LEE
You can read about the past and hear about the past, but it’s not every day you get to taste the past. The British food, posset, is one of the rare occasions where past meets present, but the modern version of posset isn’t exactly the same as the posset that King Charles I ate and Shakespeare wrote about.
Historically, posset was made with curdled cream or milk mixed with some form of liquor — usually, sweet ale or cherry— and was often served spiced with things like cinnamon and fruit, or mixed with fruit juices. It was often served hot as a drink, and as medicine for the common cold and fevers.
Today, posset has turned into a dessert dish akin to pudding or syllabub, and is made with heavy creams, lots of sugar, and fruit flavoring — typically lemon. Modern posset is very smooth and decadent, with a mousse-like texture, and is usually served cold and topped with whipped cream and fruit.