Food - Drink
Brazil's Canjica De Milho Dessert Has Been Around Since The
17th Century
By CLARICE KNELLY
Brazil is the country that produces the most sugar in the world, so it may come as no surprise that it has some top-notch desserts that may be worth hopping on a plane for. Each of Brazil’s diverse regions has its own indulgent creations, but in
the Southern region, their dessert of
choice is canjica de milho.
While this dish is a popular dessert eaten at certain celebrations in the country, its origins lie in the 17th century with Brazil's enslaved populations. Much of Brazil's cuisine and overall way of life has been formed by a fusion of cultures that include indigenous groups, enslaved Africans, Portuguese colonizers, and other immigrants.
Canjica de milho, which means corn hominy in Portuguese, is made from corn or hominy, as the name suggests, and sweetened with sugar and served during the country's corn harvest season. It is also served during
the Festa Junina, which celebrates the
end of the rainy harvest season.