City Guide

The more things change, the more Paris stays the same. Although many of the city's best restaurants now have young, foreign chefs shaking up the scene, French diners still expect them to respect seasonality and be dedicated to terroir even as they embrace more freedom and flexibility. There are classic silver platters heaped with oysters and shaved ice at the new L'Avant Comptoir de la Mer, but instead of serving them on a white tablecloth under a stained glass dome, diners stand at a bar filled with French rugby players and elbow their way to reach communal slabs of butter.

After a chaotic year in the City of Light, there's a return to foods that are anything but. Pot-au-feu, steak frites, frog's legs, escargots—these much-dreamed-about but rarely available dishes are no longer the stuff of Francophile fantasy. Newcomers like La Bourse et La Vie or Mensae have young chefs reviving lost dishes and turning their obsessive focus on sourcing great ingredients for Grand-mère's cuisine. In other words, put away the shaved vegetables and microgreen garnish. The bistro is back.

ICONIC DISHES

Riz au Lait with Salted Caramel

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L'Ami Jean
LOCAL EXPERT

Yves Camdeborde

Owner/Chef at Le Comptoir, L'Avant Comptoir and L'Avant Comptoir de la Mer

"My ideal day of eating in Paris would start with breakfast at Chambelland, a little bakery near me. For lunch, a little bistro called Aux Deux Amis, which is très parisien, very healthy and very fresh. For aperitif, I'd have six oysters at my bar, L'Avant Comptoir de la Mer, with a nice Muscadet. To finish the evening, I'd eat at Le Baratin in haute Belleville."

Local Expert

Peter Orr

Chef at Martin

"There's so much to love about the food scene here in Paris. Restaurants are becoming more accessible and more relaxed, with an emphasis on top-quality ingredients. New restaurants and bars are opening up all the time that offer exciting food and drink particularly with a trend toward young, international chefs who bring their own array of skills and styles."

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